Author Topic: (Book) Solitude; In Pursuit of a Singular Life in a Crowded World--M. Harris  (Read 271 times)

tumbleweed

Has anybody read this?  I just started it.

The first chapter was about a woman, Dr. Edith Bone, who was kept in near-solitary confinement in Hungary for 7 years.  She came out of it sane and smiling, perhaps as a result of things she did to keep occupied.  She went on imaginary walking tours of major cities she had visited, made an abacus out of broom straw and rolled-up bread crumbs, recited and wrote poetry, and probably lots more. 

There are some great quotes I may add to this.   

Book

  • Adult Filter OFF
  • LC Regular
  • *
  • Posts: 577
  • 500000 credits
  • View Inventory
  • Send Money To Book
  • Karma: 15
  • M O D E R A T O R
  • I am : Extreme Loner (i'm here neither to make friends nor enemies)
  • Loner Personality: INTJ (The Scientist)
Hey Tumble,

Thanks for posting your discovery of this book. I'm always up for reading another even though I'm already buried under a pile of books to read.

You can never have too many!

Take care,
Book /read
Quote
History . . . is a nightmare from which I'm trying to awake.

tumbleweed

I've only read another chapter.  It was one of those disturbing recountings of how connected everybody is now, cell phones always in hand, checking social media multiple times per day, and so forth.  When I don't like a book, I read it very slowly.  Still, I'll pick it up every now and then, remembering how I liked the one about the North Pond hermit more as it went along, and now it's part of my permanent collection.  I'll report again when I've gotten farther into this one.  But this book was not well-liked by Amazon reviewers.   

Book, I know what you mean about a lot of books.  I'm still rebuilding my collection after moving about 10 times in the last 15 years (the meaning behind calling myself "tumbleweed.")  I've been her for a year and, let's see, 8 months.  I still don't want to move again, and it's partly because I give away so many books each time.   :cry:

I just went to the used book store today, 2nd and Charles, where they put out free books (that people brought in and 2&C didn't buy, and the people didn't want to take back home.)  I brought back 6 books in good condition.  One was the first in the Dragonriders of Pern series; one was "A Raisin in the Sun" which I think had some important stuff in it and was/is a classic; and one I had heard of but never read, _The Perks of Being a Wallflower_. I wonder how many of these you know. 

This is a Sunday tradition for me, mining for additions to my permanent collection.  Back to the so-many- books idea that I took off from, my bookshelves are packed full, I have borderline-good books stashed in other locations, but still I usually go out and get more on Sunday.  (I take back the ones that don't make it onto my shelves.)

I'd bet you can understand doing this.

Book

  • Adult Filter OFF
  • LC Regular
  • *
  • Posts: 577
  • 500000 credits
  • View Inventory
  • Send Money To Book
  • Karma: 15
  • M O D E R A T O R
  • I am : Extreme Loner (i'm here neither to make friends nor enemies)
  • Loner Personality: INTJ (The Scientist)
Tumble, you're going to make me cry. While I was working I had to move about 10 times in 25 years. I cannot remember how many books I've had to donate/abandon.

My library would probably be bigger than a rural library somewhere if I'd been able to keep them all.

Book /read
Quote
History . . . is a nightmare from which I'm trying to awake.

tumbleweed

Sorry, Book.  I always took a couple of dozen books with me, and I'd guess you did too.  And I'm rebuilding; there have been some very good books in the free bin.


I've read another chapter of the Harris book.  It was very interesting, maybe enough to make the book a keeper.  It talks about the benefits of solitude.  He identifies 3:  creativity, learning about yourself, and, surprisingly, closeness to others.  Well, maybe.  In my case, I have noticed in the past that the less I'm around people the more I enjoy the occasional contact.  That's not what Harris was talking about.  It was more about appreciating the people in your life--the good relationships.  This may be true for most people. 

He also reports on the "epidemic of loneliness" happening even as people are more connected electronicallly--he says 40% in the middle-aged and older in the USA, referring to a 2015 study.  Okay, those people may use Facebook etc. less. It would be interesting to see a good study on how lonely heavy Facebook users are. 

He talks about how solitude has been a valued part of life in other places and times: meditation retreats, lone "vision quest" rites of passage, and so on.  He mentions the psychologist Jung's emphasis on the necessity becoming a separate individual. 


That's as far as I've gotten.  I might not be posting much in the future, for how long I don't know.  I think I'll explain it to Book; if anyone else wants to know why, you can ask her.  It's nothing "bad," I just don't want to expose my weirdness to the general public.  *Harmless* weirdness.